In Plato, Gorgias, Socrates makes the claim that, “the only serious friendship a dictator can form, then, is with the same sort of person as himself-someone with the same likes and dislikes, but who doesn’t mind being subject and subordinate to a ruler.” At first I found this passage confusing, and I had to read this statement multiple times. However, after I reflected on the text, I realized what Socrates was claiming to Callicles.

In this passage, Socrates directly claims that the only type of friend that a dictator can have is someone who is very similar to him. In order for this to occur, the person must like and dislike the exact same thing as the dictator. However, the person must be able to not mind being either the subject or subordinate; otherwise known as the lowest person that is referred to by the ruler. The person must have power and be able to resemble the dictator as much as he can.

This passage in Gorgias caught my attention because it consisted of a long discussion between Socrates and Callicles that seemed to interest me. “The only serious friendship a dictator can form, then, is with the same sort of person as himself-someone with the same likes and dislikes, but who doesn’t mind being subject and subordinate to a ruler.” From Socrates argument and discussion, I now see why he claims this statement to Callicles.

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