In Aristotle’s, Ethics, Aristotle makes the claim that, “What is honorable and pleasant is what is so to the excellent person; and to each type of person the activity expressing his own proper state is most choice worthy; hence the activity expressing virtue is most choice worthy to the excellent person <and hense is most honorable and pleasant>.” At first I found this passage confusing and I had to analyze this statement in a more inclusive way. However, after I reflected on this text, I realized what Aristotle was claiming and asserting in this passage.

In this passage, Aristotle states that an excellent person, that which is expressing virtue, is the most excellent person. The activity conveying his proper state is his choice and decision, therefore the activity that is being expressed, is more choice worthy to the excellent person. Thus, this makes the activity more honorable and pleasant to the person expressing the specific activity.

This passage caught my attention because now I have a better understanding of what Aristotle is claiming, “What is honorable and pleasant is what is so to the excellent person; and to each type of person the activity expressing his own proper state is most choice worthy; hence the activity expressing virtue is most choice worthy to the excellent person <and hense is most honorable and pleasant>.” With knowing this, an excellent person expressing the activity and shows virtue, is more honorable and pleasant.

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